Archive for category Rosarito real estate

Two Baja Real Estate Firms Merge To Become Powerful Force In Northern Baja

ROSARITO, BAJA CALIFORNIA, April 4, 2011 – Baja Real Estate Group, the leading Real Estate brokerage in the Rosarito area, has announced plans to merge with Bajamar Premier Properties, a firm with significant presence in the Ensenada region.

Two Baja Real Estate Firms Merge To Become Powerful Force In Northern Baja

Two Baja Real Estate Firms Merge To Become Powerful Force In Northern Baja

According to Max Katz, owner of Baja Real Estate Group, the new company will be called Baja Real Estate Group but will operate two divisions, Beachside Realty in Rosarito and Baja Premiere Properties in Bajamar and Ensenada. A new office is already planned in the Guadalupe Valley, just north of Ensenada.

Mimi Mills and associates have an outstanding reputation in the area,” said Max Katz, “and her long history throughout northern Baja will contribute greatly to the strength of our new organization.”

Bajamar Premier Properties began within the gated oceanfront golf community of Bajamar, since 2005 guiding American and Canadian expatriates through safe and successful transactions.

“Max and his wife Kathy Katz represent some of the most respected real estate developers in the region and, as we combine our forces, we will be able to serve more new developments and spread our expertise to those who need our services,” said Marianne “Mimi” Mills.

New residential developments currently represented by the Baja Real Estate Group include Calafia Resort and Villas in the area known as Calafia, 10 Miles south of Rosarito; Palacio del Mar in El Descanso, 20 miles south of Rosarito, and Naos, where sales recently began in the northern beach corridor of Rosarito Read the rest of this entry »

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Retire to Mexico — the price is right

By Les Christie, staff writerApril 28, 2010: 10:48 AM ET

Retire to Mexico -- the price is right

Retire to Mexico -- the price is right

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — The years-long trend of Americans buying homes and expatriating to Mexico has collapsed, done in by a trifecta of the recession, swine flu and an epic crime wave.

Sales volume plunged nearly 70% last year for Coldwell Banker, according Phillip Hendrix, director of the firm’s Mexican operations. And at Costa Baja, a residential resort development a few miles north of La Paz, sales have slowed by about 40% in the past 12 months.

“Sales are off like crazy. The recession is really hurting and the headlines have been driving people away. The narco-wars especially have bit into the housing market in Mexico,” said Tom Kelly, a follower of Mexican real estate trends and author of Cashing In on a Second Home in Mexico.

But that’s good news for Americans who have always dreamed of retiring to Mexico but could never afford it: The bust has made homebuying a bargain. Prices can be less than half of what an equivalent home would run in the U.S.

Although the crime wave is confined to a fairly limited area, the perception of it has hurt markets all over the nation, said Alejandro Yberri, CEO of Costa Baja.

Information on prices of homes being sold to expatriate Americans is sketchy, but Kelly estimates overall declines of between 20% and 30% since the peak. In the high-crime communities close to the U.S. border, the drop has been even steeper, perhaps 40% or more. Read the rest of this entry »

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Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Lured by spicy quail, tuna ceviche, and Mexico’s best fish tacos, T+L lights out for Ensenada—and from there, things just go south.
From May 2010 By Peter Jon Lindberg

Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Ensenada and the nearby Valle de Guadalupe, in northern Baja, are known outside Mexico for three things: the burgeoning local wine scene, which has been hyped ad infinitum; the food, which hasn’t been hyped enough; and the spectacularly bad roads, which everyone warns you about, though you never fully believe them. Really, you think, how bad could they be? And then one night in the gathering dark you take an innocent shortcut across the valley and drive your rented Hyundai into a riverbed. A dry riverbed, but a riverbed all the same. You and your equally baffled companion spend 40 minutes spinning the car’s wheels in what might as well be quicksand, then digging frantically, then panicking, then digging and spinning some more, until finally you resolve to abandon the car and hike the two miles back to the highway—suitcases sinking in gravel, sand filling your socks. And as the coyotes wail in the ink-black hills you decide that you probably should have paid more attention to that part about the roads.

“Ah, the Baja shortcut!” said our innkeeper, Phil Gregory, when, at the conclusion of said ordeal, he collected us and our dusty belongings from the side of Highway 3. “Never a good idea!” Severe rains the previous week, our host explained, had caused the river to flood, washing away a whole chunk of the road we were on. Those tire tracks I’d followed across the sandy riverbed—believing we were still on course—had been left by a backhoe, dispatched to repair the road. No one had bothered to post a sign, let alone erect a fence. “Honestly, this happens all the time,” Gregory said as we rattled down the inn’s rutted dirt driveway. He meant this to be reassuring. “But let’s get you settled, pour you some wine, and we’ll retrieve your car in the morning!”

Gregory’s tone was oddly chipper—maybe this did happen all the time? After showering off the dust, we sampled the inn’s own Tempranillo beside a crackling mesquite fire in the lounge. Not the smoothest specimen, but it worked: two glasses later I gave up worrying about the Hyundai. Read the rest of this entry »

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Baby Boomers Buying In These Locations Now For Their Future

Boomers Buying Baja Lots

Boomers Buying Baja Lots

Since the early days in Baja, US Citizens have been buying residential Beach Front and Ocean View lots , building their dream Beach House, and for an increasing number, their retirement homes. Many of the older and more stable communities in Playas de Rosarito such as Las Gaviotas , Real Del Mar , San Antonio Del Mar and Mission Viejo and Punta Piedra all started out selling lots, most of which had very good building restrictions in place.

These Baja communities have established a reputation as a great place to live or buy a home. Over the last few years, with the increase in demand along the coast, many Americans had given up the idea of building and went with new condo construction. However, once again retirees are looking at their future and they are opting to cash in now for the perfect location and buying a lot while taking advantage of the current pricing advantage here in Baja.

In the 3 to 5 years as the real estate markets return to normal these lucky buyers will already have their future in place at today’s favorable prices. Currently to build a home in Baja would cost on average 45.00 to 70.00 per square foot for quality construction. Timing is typically between six and nine months from start to finish. Octavio Serrano of OCA a well known architect says that while the idea of building can be scary for many Americans, that the over all cost savings far out ways any head aches the client my have. And in the end they all say they would do it all over again. Permitting is much like the US where you first need to obtain an official topographic drawing, a building permit and then finally a completed work report. All of these can be handled by your architect.

Working with a good architect who is not only reputable, but also has Vision beyond what a clients needs are for today is KEY says Kathy Katz, owner of Baja Real Estate Group . Katz says that in many of these communities such as Las Gaviotas which started out offering lots Americans built there dream homes over the years, and when they came up for re-sale she always knew which ones would re sale the fastest strictly due to the architecture styling, she adds that you can change the color of the walls and tile, but the architecture stays with the home for ever. Just recently she has seen an increase in quality Baja lots coming on to the market, where in the past they were either not available, or cost prohibitive.

For example a 2200 sq ft lot in Real Del Mar a Golf Course Community that once sold for 75-80 thousand, is listed today for $43,000. An ocean front 7500 sq ft lot in Punta Piedra a gated community is now available for $450,000, where once prices for the same size lot were approaching 1 million.

Can you imagine having your own lap pool with the waves crashing at you front door says Katz. In this market buyers are not only looking at cost of living and a life style, but they are looking at the values in the market, making this a time to act.

See more Rosarito Real Estate, Ensenada Real Estate, Baja Real Estate and Mexico Real Estate.

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The Villa’s at Club Marena- Relaxed Riviera Style

Club Marena Villas

Club Marena Villas

In 1989 the partners of the Club Marena Development decided to take beautiful strip of the Baja coast in a well know cove, south of Rosarito, to create some of the most premium Baja Real Estate that the area had ever seen. The land was originally owned by the Cota family and was a popular camping spot from as far back as the 1940’s. Surfers from around the world would set up camp to sample the smooth pealing point waves. Surfing Legends the likes of Skip Fry, Corky Carrol and Jerry Lopez would dawn the point for pleasure and even a few completions.

Marena’s decision to transform this idyllic piece of Baja into the Coast’s first true luxury development turned out to me a monumental one. Twenty-Seven luxury villas & one custom home-site were planned, for phase one, of what would become one of the coasts most successful residential resorts. An impressive clubhouse, a spectacular spa and an infinity edge pool were all part of the plan.

Each villa would have an idyllic layout for a seaside retreat. Drive into a private, two car garage with complete laundry facilities. Pull in and park in safety and comfort. Walk into a lush, well appointed personal courtyard and feel the Mediterranean essence of this Riviera style resort. The courtyards offer a special space for private puttering in your own garden. It is the perfect place for a private hot tub, koi pond or outdoor kitchen. Some of the villas have a casita with a third bedroom bordering the courtyard.

The charm of the architecture and the well planned layout of this location are exceptional and were unprecedented, at the time, in this sleepy village in the area south of Rosarito know as Bahia Descanso, “restful bay”. This area represented the premium Rosarito Real Estate and a unique geography on this section of the coast at the time of construction.

People who know the area are very cognizant of the unique micro-climate in this locality. Southern orientation with coastal hills keep the winds side shore, the weather patterns a little sunnier and the area more temperate than just 15 minutes up the coast.

The oceanfront master suite represents the dream we all have in coastal sleeping comfort. The sounds of the waves pour past the private balcony and into the spacious sleeping space accented with the warmth of a cozy fireplace.

The open floor plan of the lower level provides a spacious living space with great accommodations for home entertainment and adorned with another fireplace. A well designed kitchen opens up to the dining and living area. Walk though the space and onto the brick patio and your private wood sundeck. Outdoor living space is what the villas bring better than any condo and most homes in the area. This is what makes life in a Club Marena villa so special.

By 1992 this first phase of what would become one of the coasts most coveted developments would be completed. Villas Marena, as it was know back then, launched a new era of development on Baja’s Gold Coast. Baja had not yet scene this Riviera style of luxury architecture and planning combined with stylish oceanfront amenities. Many phases of development have followed and additional amenities have been added. However the unique character of the villas makes then one of the most desirable acquisitions in Rosarito real estate.

Browse for Club Marena Listings.

Larry French

Larry French

Larry French is an Executive Sales Agent with Baja Real Estate Group with 10 years experience with web based and multimedia marketing. incorporated in Mexico for Real Estate and investment business for over 6 years. Active investor in Northern Baja with very successful portfolio. Certified member of AMPI/NAR Full-time resident of the Northern Baja area with visa and work permits.

Broswe for more Baja Real Estate, Rosarito Real Estate, Ensenada Real Estate and Mexico Real Estate.

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One Journalist’s View By Linda Ellerbee

Linda Ellerbee

Linda Ellerbee

Sometimes I’ve been called a maverick because I don’t always agree with my colleagues, but then, only dead fish swim with the stream all the time. The stream here is Mexico.

You would have to be living on another planet to avoid hearing how dangerous Mexico has become, and, yes, it’s true drug wars have escalated violence in Mexico , causing collateral damage, a phrase I hate. Collateral damage is a cheap way of saying that innocent people, some of them tourists, have been robbed, hurt or killed.

But that’s not the whole story. Neither is this. This is my story.

I’m a journalist who lives in New York City , but has spent considerable time in Mexico , specifically Puerto Vallarta , for the last four years. I’m in Vallarta now. And despite what I’m getting from the U.S. media, the 24-hour news networks in particular, I feel as safe here as I do at home in New York , possibly safer. I walk the streets of my Vallarta neighborhood alone day or night. And I don’t live in a gated community, or any other All-Gringo neighborhood. I live in Mexico . Among Mexicans. I go where I want (which does not happen to include bars where prostitution and drugs are the basic products), and take no more precautions than I would at home in New York; which is to say I don’t wave money around, I don’t act the Ugly American, I do keep my eyes open, I’m aware of my surroundings, and I try not to behave like a fool.

I’ve not always been successful at that last one. One evening a friend left the house I was renting in Vallarta at that time, and, unbeknownst to me, did not slam the automatically-locking door on her way out. Sure enough, less than an hour later a stranger did come into my house. A burglar? Robber? Kidnapper? Killer? Drug lord?

No, it was a local police officer, the “beat cop” for our neighborhood, who, on seeing my unlatched door, entered to make sure everything (including me) was okay. He insisted on walking with me around the house, opening closets, looking behind doors and, yes, even under beds, to be certain no one else had wandered in, and that nothing was missing. He was polite, smart and kind, but before he left, he lectured me on having not checked to see that my friend had locked the door behind her. In other words, he told me to use my common sense.

Do bad things happen here? Of course they do. Bad things happen everywhere, but the murder rate here is much lower than, say, New Orleans, and if there are bars on many of the ground floor windows of houses here, well, the same is true where I live, in Greenwich Village, which is considered a swell neighborhood — house prices start at about $4 million (including the bars on the ground floor windows).

There are good reasons thousands of people from the United States are moving to Mexico every month, and it’s not just the lower cost of living, a hefty tax break and less snow to shovel. Mexico is a beautiful country, a special place. The climate varies, but is plentifully mild, the culture is ancient and revered, the young are loved unconditionally, the old are respected, and I have yet to hear anyone mention Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan, or Madonna’s attempt to adopt a second African child, even though, with such a late start, she cannot possibly begin to keep up with Anglelina Jolie.

And then there are the people. Generalization is risky, but— in general — Mexicans are warm, friendly, generous and welcoming. If you smile at them, they smile back. If you greet a passing stranger on the street, they greet you back. If you try to speak even a little Spanish, they tend to treat you as though you were fluent. Or at least not an idiot. I have had taxi drivers track me down after leaving my wallet or cell phone in their cab. I have had someone run out of a store to catch me because I have overpaid by twenty cents. I have been introduced to and come to love a people who celebrate a day dedicated to the dead as a recognition of the cycles of birth and death and birth — and the 15th birthday of a girl, an important rite in becoming a woman — with the same joy.

Too much of the noise you’re hearing about how dangerous it is to come to Mexico is just that — noise. But the media love noise, and too many journalists currently making it don’t live here. Some have never even been here. They just like to be photographed at night, standing near a spotlighted border crossing, pointing across the line to some imaginary country from hell. It looks good on TV.

Another thing. The U.S. media tend to lump all of Mexico into one big bad bowl. Talking about drug violence in Mexico without naming a state or city where this is taking place is rather like looking at the horror of Katrina and saying, “Damn. Did you know the U.S. is under water?” or reporting on the shootings at Columbine or the bombing of the Federal building in Oklahoma City by saying that kids all over the U.S. are shooting their classmates and all the grownups are blowing up buildings. The recent rise in violence in Mexico has mostly occurred in a few states, and especially along the border. It is real, but it does not describe an entire country.

It would be nice if we could put what’s going on in Mexico in perspective, geographically and emotionally. It would be nice if we could remember that, as has been noted more than once, these drug wars wouldn’t be going on if people in the United States didn’t want the drugs, or if other people in the United States weren’t selling Mexican drug lords the guns. Most of all, it would be nice if more people in the United States actually came to this part of America ( Mexico is also America , you will recall) to see for themselves what a fine place Mexico really is, and how good a vacation (or a life) here can be.

So come on down and get to know your southern neighbors. I think you’ll like it here. Especially the people. ***
http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Ellerbee


Considering the scenic landscape that Northern Baja California offers, you might want to have a look at real estate for sale in Rosarito especially in Palacio Del Mar, Calafia Condos, Las Gaviotas or Club Marena. Browse for Mexico Real Estate, Baja Real Estate, Ensenada Real Estate.

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Is it possible for Americans to work in Baja

Boomers Buying Baja Lots

Boomers Buying Baja Lots

Since the early days in Baja, US Citizens have been buying residential Beach Front and Ocean View lots , building their dream Beach House, and for an increasing number, their retirement homes. Many of the older and more stable communities in Playas de Rosarito such as Las Gaviotas , Real Del Mar , San Antonio Del Mar and Mission Viejo and Punta Piedra all started out selling lots, most of which had very good building restrictions in place.

These Baja communities have established a reputation as a great place to live or buy a home. Over the last few years, with the increase in demand along the coast, many Americans had given up the idea of building and went with new condo construction. However, once again retirees are looking at their future and they are opting to cash in now for the perfect location and buying a lot while taking advantage of the current pricing advantage here in Baja.

In the 3 to 5 years as the real estate markets return to normal these lucky buyers will already have their future in place at today’s favorable prices. Currently to build a home in Baja would cost on average 45.00 to 70.00 per square foot for quality construction. Timing is typically between six and nine months from start to finish. Octavio Serrano of OCA a well known architect says that while the idea of building can be scary for many Americans, that the over all cost savings far out ways any head aches the client my have. And in the end they all say they would do it all over again. Permitting is much like the US where you first need to obtain an official topographic drawing, a building permit and then finally a completed work report. All of these can be handled by your architect.

Working with a good architect who is not only reputable, but also has Vision beyond what a clients needs are for today is KEY says Kathy Katz, owner of Baja Real Estate Group . Katz says that in many of these communities such as Las Gaviotas which started out offering lots Americans built there dream homes over the years, and when they came up for re-sale she always knew which ones would re sale the fastest strictly due to the architecture styling, she adds that you can change the color of the walls and tile, but the architecture stays with the home for ever. Just recently she has seen an increase in quality lots coming on to the market, where in the past they were either not available, or cost prohibitive.

For example a 2200 sq ft lot in Real Del Mar a Golf Course Community that once sold for 75-80 thousand, is listed today for $43,000. An ocean front 7500 sq ft lot in Punta Piedra a gated community is now available for $450,000, where once prices for the same size lot were approaching 1 million.

Can you imagine having your own lap pool with the waves crashing at you front door says Katz. In this market buyers are not only looking at cost of living and a life style, but they are looking at the values in the market, making this a time to act.

Browse for Rosarito Real Estate, Baja Real Estate and Mexico Real Estate.

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How Americans are Stretching Their Money South of the Border in Baja California Mexico

Americans struggling with the economy are finding relief south of the border. The overall lower cost of living, affordable beach front housing, lower property taxes as well as proximity and accessibility to US services, have made Baja California a preferred choice for relocation among retirees and families alike.

How Americans are Stretching Their Money South of the Border in Baja California, MexicoROSARITO, BAJA CALIFORNIA. MEXICO – Many Americans with reduced and fixed incomes are looking outside of the US for retirement and economic relief in these tough times, finding it just south of the border. Baja California, Mexico is leading the trend to cater to retirees, by offering services that appeal to the growing number of foreign residents. These services include assisted living, property and personal care among others at significantly lower prices than in the US.

US store names like Home Depot, Wal-Mart, Smart and Final, Applebee’s and Ashley Furniture are some of which are becoming more common in strip malls around the area. State of the art medical facilities equal to those on the US have been and are being constructed in order to provide quality medical care services to the growing number of foreign residents, the only difference being the lower cost. Read the rest of this entry »

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Baja Developers Halt Is this a sign of good things to come?

Calafia Condos: One of the developments that never stopped construction

Calafia Condos: One of the developments that never stopped construction

With the collapse of the money markets on both sides of the border, it had become almost impossible –or so it seamed- for Baja developers to finish their projects.

Finding investors or financing for the final completion of their development seemed impossible. The financial situation in the U.S. did not make matters any better. Potential buyers stopped investing in Mexico because of the economy. Current buyers began to doubt the developers’ ability to complete their development. In the last few days –and weeks- however, we have seen a change.

Could it be the end of the bad times for the region? Here are some clues: Read the rest of this entry »

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Adam Behar: The changing face of Baja Norte

he rugged beauty of “The Gold Coast,” the 70-mile stretch of coastline that leads to Ensenada, is reminiscent of Big Sur. (Photo courtesy Baja Breeze Magazine)

he rugged beauty of “The Gold Coast,” the 70-mile stretch of coastline that leads to Ensenada, is reminiscent of Big Sur. (Photo courtesy Baja Breeze Magazine)

There’s more to Mexico than swine flu and drug cartels. But you wouldn’t know it by watching cable news.

It’s true that President Felipe Calderon’s efforts to crack down on the Mexican drug cartels have unleashed inter-gang killings. It’s a face of Mexico that we may find grim and frightening even though it poses little, if any, risk to law-abiding Americans.

But Mexico has another face, another story that runs counter to the conventional wisdom: Baja norte is coming of age.

Behind the scenes, a new Tijuana has been hatching into a vibrant, multi-layered city, arguably more cosmopolitan than some U.S. cities. And in spite of its problems, it is experiencing something of a cultural renaissance. Tijuana’s creative community, named among the top eight in the world by Newsweek, includes a new generation of bold, contemporary artists, writers, graphic designers and multi-media artists, film makers, and advertising agencies. The Tijuana Cultural Center, an architectural triumph in itself, is now an important venue for the arts. Read the rest of this entry »

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